12 May 2020

Learning what’s dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price

For social animals, such as humans, being able to recognize the presence of a threat in the behavior of others could literally be a life-saver. Yet, animals do not instinctively know that when a group member displays freezing – one of the three universal defense responses – it means trouble. Now, new findings by the Behavioural Neuroscience Lab demonstrate how animals acquire this ability and identify the neural circuitry crucial for implementing it.

Learning what’s dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price

For social animals, such as humans, being able to recognize the presence of a threat in the behavior of others could literally be a life-saver. Yet, animals do not instinctively know that when a group member displays freezing – one of the three universal defense responses – it means trouble. Now, new findings by the Behavioural Neuroscience Lab demonstrate how animals acquire this ability and identify the neural circuitry crucial for implementing it.


Photo: pixabay.

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